Year: 1998-1999
Month: November
Leader: Group E

Situation/Case Study:
TEACHER ROLE/RESPONSIBILITY

Description:
I have got this student. It started with a rumor from other teachers "Oh, you got J." She is off the wall with nonconformative thoughts. I have her in my advisory group and in PE class. Other students do not like to be around her. Her social mannerisms are not appropriate. Once she handed out Bible tracts in class. She said, "I want to see that everyone gets to Heaven." After the Jack-o-lantern incident with her (she objected to it on religious grounds) I have been avoiding her. I don't even want to look at her. I feel bad I am doing this. Where do I jump in to help? Some of the leader girls are trying to make contact with her. She does not connect well. Should I be a social worker as well as a teacher? She is on an IEP for violent behavior. She is also gifted and talented. Mom has been institutionalized for mental illness, has abused drugs and alcohol, and has been part of a cult. The dad seems pretty straight.

Hypotheses:
The teacher might feel unprepared and without tools to deal with such a student and conflicted because personal instincts tell you to do one thing, professional code tells you another. The teacher might feel obligated to reach out and change things to impact this student’s life but hesitant to dive too deep and get involved in student’s emotional problems. A teacher might feel unprepared to deal with this situation because no one prepared him/her for this and frustrated at himself/herself and the student. You want to help but how? The teacher might feel obligated to deal with the situation. After all, he/she is the teacher, however, limited experience wise on this issue because it is unique. The teacher might feel hesitant to deal with the student on a day-to-day basis and uncomfortable with the daily routine. The teacher might feel unprepared to deal with the situation. Am I using the proper resources? Am I willing to deal with her psychological problems? A teacher might feel that he/she is not a good teacher/person because he/she is not helping enough and frustrated because he/she is not able to communicate with the student. The teacher might feel lost for an answer, not knowing where to turn or who to ask for help and hesitant to say anything to the student because he/she doesn’t know what will happen next.

Theories behind practice:
Glasser- Control Theory. Belonging. Power- is she getting her way or imposing her needs on others? Unliked or unpopular child. Teacher as Social Worker. Referral Student Emotions. Attention Seeking. Idiosyncrasies. Grief.

Impact on others:


Solutions:


Comments: